Research Asst in Boston, autism/kids

The Faja Lab at the Labs of Cognitive Neuroscience at Boston Children’s Hospital currently has a research study assistant position open to work on a project that will test a novel training intervention for executive control and examine the relation between executive control and social cognition. The project will use electrophysiology and behavioral measures to investigate these questions in 7- to 11-year-olds with autism spectrum disorders.

At Boston Children’s Hospital, success is measured in patients treated, parents comforted and teams taught. It’s in discoveries made, processes perfected, and technology advanced. In major medical breakthroughs and small acts of kindness. And in colleagues who have your back and patients who have your heart. As a teaching hospital of Harvard Medical School, our reach is global and our impact is profound. Join our acclaimed LCN Program-Division of Developmental Medicine and discover how your talents can change lives. Yours included.

This Research Study Assistant will be responsible for:

  • Recruiting and scheduling participants.
  • Running experimental study sessions.
  • Providing computer based training intervention.
  • Coordinating collection of surveys from parents and teachers, as well as data management and analysis.
  • Coordinating and training research study volunteers.

To qualify, you must have…

  • A bachelor’s degree in psychology, cognitive science, neuroscience, or related field.
  • At least one year of experience working in a research setting.
  • 2-year commitment to the position.
  • Availability for flexible scheduling including evenings and weekends to facilitate visits with school-aged children.
  • Ability to drive with a valid driver’s license.
  • Previous professional experience with children.
  • Computer skills including working knowledge of PC and Mac operating systems, basic statistics software and basic experimental presentation and collection software.
  • High level of motivation.
  • Ability to work independently and as part of a team; excellent communication, organization, and attention to detail.

 Preferred experience includes: 

  • Knowledge of psychophysiological/electrophysiological recording and/or eye-tracking measures
  • Previous professional experience with autism spectrum disorder
  • Ability to assist with grant preparation, publications, presentations and/or applications to an Institutional Review Board
  • Experience with administering and scoring standardized developmental measures


The Faja Lab at the Labs of Cognitive Neuroscience at Boston Children’s Hospital currently has a research study assistant position open to work on a project that will test a novel training intervention for executive control and examine the relation between executive control and social cognition. The project will use electrophysiology and behavioral measures to investigate these questions in 7- to 11-year-olds with autism spectrum disorders.

The Faja Lab is part of a larger research network in the Laboratories of Cognitive Neuroscience that includes a multidisciplinary team of researchers with expertise from a wide range of fields, including neuroscience, psychology, and education. In collaboration with clinical experts in fields such as developmental pediatrics and child neurology, we are working to expand our knowledge of child development and developmental disorders. Through this collaborative and comprehensive approach, we aim to drive the science forward as rapidly as possible, so that we can translate what we learn into earlier identification, improved therapies, and better outcomes for children and families affected by developmental disorders.

Original job posting

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